Reports

The Polis Center researches the trends and impacts of social and environmental issues in our community. The selection of reports below showcases our research, often conducted in collaboration with partners. This portfolio includes Polis Center Annual Reports, Disaster Planning Reports, and SAVI Community Trends Reports.

FY2020 Annual Report

The global pandemic dominated our attention in FY2020, at least since its arrival in the U.S. in early spring. In concert with the university and community, we responded with initiatives that addressed the challenges it posed, including the problems of racial, social, and economic inequalities that it revealed. This work, although spurred by the pandemic, was not new to us. Rather, it allowed Polis to use its information and analytical capabilities to new ends. Learn more!

FY2019 Annual Report

We are engaged in ground-breaking work in a variety of activities important to Indiana communities and beyond. We managed more than 93 projects in FY2019; 35 percent of these projects were new grants or contracts. The following descriptions highlight our major accomplishments in each sphere of collaboration and in a major civic enterprise, the Spirit & Place Festival, which we launched in 1995 and direct on behalf of IUPUI and the IU School of Liberal Arts.

2019 State of Indiana Standard Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan

The Indiana Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan was developed in collaboration with government, academic, and other private partners for the purpose of preventing, protecting against, responding to, and recovering from natural disasters that may threaten the State’s citizens, infrastructure, and economy. The federal Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 provides the legal basis for FEMA mitigation planning requirements for State, local, and tribal governments as a condition of federal grant assistance. Indiana must have a FEMA approved State Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan to remain eligible to receive federal assistance through the following programs: Public Assistance (Categories C-G), Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP), Pre-Disaster Mitigation Grant Program (PDM), Flood Mitigation Assistance Grant Program (FMA), and Fire Management Assistance Grants (FMAG). Since 2008, Indiana has received almost $50,000,000 in Mitigation grant funding through these programs. The 2019 Indiana Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan lays the framework for accomplishing one of the Indiana Department of Homeland Security’s top 2019-2020 strategic priorities of expanding mitigation and resiliency in the State of Indiana. This includes expanding statewide collaboration and planning, promoting safety, implementing a statewide mitigation strategy, and strengthening partnerships that impact resiliency.

FY2018 Annual Report

The Polis Center is engaged in ground-breaking work in a variety of activities important to Indiana communities and beyond. We managed more than 89 projects in FY2018 within our areas of emphasis; 54 percent of these projects were new grants or contracts. The following descriptions highlight our major accomplishments in each sphere of collaboration and in a major civic enterprise, the Spirit & Place Festival, which we launched in 1995 and now direct on behalf of IUPUI and the IU School of Liberal Arts.

2018 Report–An Update on Domestic Violence in Marion County

The Polis Center produced this report as a part of a data integration, assessment, and analysis project for the Domestic Violence Network. The purpose of the project was to update and expand findings released in the November 2014 report to gain a better understanding of the state of domestic violence in Marion County. This project also builds the foundation for developing a public-facing web tool to summarize the findings of this report.

2018 SAVI Community Trends–Where Schools are Changing: Regional and Neighborhood Dynamics from 2010-2016

Families often choose where to live based on neighborhood characteristics, especially the quality and reputation of nearby schools. But we live in a highly mobile society, in a rapidly changing region, and many of Central Indiana’s neighborhoods have seen significant change in their residents and their schools. A generalized understanding of school characteristics and how they change over time is complicated by the numerous metrics used to describe school quality and performance, as well as shifting policies governing school assessment and ratings. This report analyzes publicly available data at the school level to summarize key indicators of change and how that change can be understood at the community and regional levels. We used state-reported data from the 2009-2010 and 2015-2016 academic years to interpret these trends in the Indianapolis region. We performed analyses from three perspectives, 1) finding demographic changes at the school level that are indicative of neighborhood changes, 2) viewing regional trends that cut across district lines, and 3) analyzing the spatial characteristics of school change.

2018 SAVI Community Trends–Neighborhood Change 1970-2016: Suburbanization, Gentrification, and Redevelopment

From 1970 to 2016, the forces of suburbanization and white flight, and the ensuing forces of urbanization, significantly changed neighborhoods across the Indianapolis region. White, educated, and middle- to upper-income households left the core of Indianapolis in the 1970s. They moved to the outskirts of Marion County and to other counties, enabled by the construction of Interstates 65 and 70 (fully complete by 1974), which made it easier to commute to Indianapolis from suburban areas. Racially discriminatory real estate practices like blockbusting, and lending practices like red-lining, encouraged white households to leave Indianapolis and prevented Black households from moving to new, suburban communities. Today, demand for communities with a mix of housing, shopping, and other uses3 has impacted urban and suburban communities differently. In some urban neighborhoods, this demand has translated to increases in the populations that can afford to move there: white, educated, and middle- to upper-income. In some suburban neighborhoods, demand for urbanization has led to the build-out of dense city centers.

2017 Annual Report

The Polis Center is engaged in innovative work in a variety of activities important to Indiana communities and beyond. We managed more than 65 projects in FY2017 within our areas of emphasis; 40 percent of these projects were new grants or contracts. The following descriptions highlights our major accomplishments in each area of emphasis and in the major civic enterprise, the Spirit & Place Festival, which we direct on behalf of IUPUI and the IU School of Liberal Arts.

2017 SAVI Community Trends–Who Rides the Bus: Examining Transit Ridership in Marion County

Transportation is not limited to one’s ability to move from place to place; it is often essential for an individual or family’s economic and social mobility. Transit advances opportunity for economic mobility by providing affordable transportation to better jobs, more jobs, and reliable transportation to the jobs riders already have. It also promotes social mobility by providing transportation options for people without vehicles, youth under the driving age, seniors, and those who cannot or choose not to drive themselves. Moreover, public transit also reduces traffic congestion and the negative environmental impacts of single-occupancy automobile use, promotes smarter regional growth, and creates an affordable choice for making daily trips. This analysis clusters transit ridership into five groups (A-E) based on data from a recent ridership survey. Data from surveys are combined with neighborhood statistics, allowing us to consider the role of transit and the service it provides to our community’s diverse ridership. Approximately every five years, transit agencies conduct onboard surveys which typically include questions about riders’ transit behavior and other information about themselves. The responses are used to plan improvements to service and operations. The Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization, in partnership with the Indianapolis Public Transit Corporation (IndyGo), most recently completed one of these surveys in October 2016.

2017 Community Trends–Unequal Access: Tobacco Retail in the  Indianapolis Metro Area

Retail access to various smoking products is an important consideration when discussing community action to improve a community’s health.  Studies show that tobacco outlet density and proximity are linked to tobacco use–particularly in poor areas. We used socioeconomic data culled from the SAVI community information system to examine the density and proximity of tobacco outlets relative to vulnerable communities in Marion County.  The report serves as a companion piece to the IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health’s September 201Report on the Tobacco Epidemic in Marion County and Indiana.

2016 Annual Report

We managed more than 60 projects in FY2016 within our areas of emphasis; 50 percent of these projects were new grants or contracts. The following description highlights our major accomplishments in each area of emphasis and in the major civic enterprise, the Spirit & Place Festival, which we direct on behalf of IUPUI and the IU School of Liberal Arts.

2016 Community Trends–The Affordable Housing Market and Why It Matters

Financial stability for individuals and families is critical on many levels, providing a sense that one can, at minimum, consistently provide shelter and food. A living wage is a determining factor of economic stability; it is a path to quality education that provides marketable skills. Owning a home is often considered a reflection of a family’s financial health. This magazine’s feature story, “A Better Foundation: Building Economic Prosperity with Truly Affordable Housing,” highlights a central theme of the report, The Affordable Housing Market and Why It Matters: that affordable housing encompasses a broader range of economic issues than the price of a home. In addition, we share stories from area nonprofits that used SAVI data to help obtain funding for job training programs, and feature a new web tool, the community assessment and planning tool which allows users to develop custom and updatable research reports.

2015 Allen County, Indiana Threat and Hazard Identification Risk Assessment Report

The Allen County Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) is an all-hazards planning tool designed to help the county understand the full-range of its risks and estimate
capability requirements for the whole community including individuals, businesses, faith-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, schools and academia, and all levels of government.

2015 Clark County Multihazard Mitigation Plan

Clark County’s multi-hazard mitigation plan was developed in 2008 and updated in 2015 by The Polis Center at Indiana University Purdue University-Indianapolis (IUPUI). The Clark County Emergency Management Agency would like to thank The Polis Center, River Hills Economic Development District and Regional Planning Commission (River Hills EDD & RPC), and the Clark County Multi-Hazard Mitigation planning team for their contributions and assistance in development of the 2015 Clark County multihazard mitigation plan update. Through the combined efforts, input and support of these organizations, Clark County continues to build its capacity to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from disasters.

2015 SAVI Community Trends–Worlds Apart: Gaps in Life Expectancy in the Indianapolis Metro Area

Two communities that are both situated within the Indianapolis metropolitan area and separated by only 28 miles are in reality worlds apart. One sits in a northeastern suburb of Indianapolis. Its residents have a life expectancy of 83.7 years, rivaling the top-ranking countries of the world, Switzerland (83 years) and Japan (84 years).  Taking a drive from that community along I-465 and I-70 into the city, life expectancy drops off – to 78.9 years, then to 74.2 years – until you arrive in the second community, situated within the urban core directly south of Monument Circle.  Its residents have a life expectancy of 69.4 years, similar to countries like Uzbekistan (69 years), Bangladesh (70 years), and Iraq (70 years).  In this analysis, we explore why and share results of our analysis of life expectancy across the 11 counties and more than 100 ZIP codes in the Indianapolis metro area.

2015 SAVI Community Trends–Trends in Crime: Do Perceptions Match Reality?

Crime and public safety are important social and political issues faced by cities and communities across the country. Contrary to public perception, over the past two decades crime rates across the United States have decreased dramatically (Wolfers, 2014; McCarthy, 2015; Lopez, 2015). In 1994 the national Part I crime rate (the combination of property and violent crime) was 53 crimes per 1,000 people. In 2013, the rate was 31 crimes per 1,000 people, a decline of 41.5 percent. Yet, the story has not been the same across the country. When examining trends in crime at different geographic areas, such as counties, cities, or neighborhood the story becomes more complicated.

2014 Annual Report

We managed more than 95 projects in FY 2014 within our areas of emphasis; 48 percent of these projects were new grants or contracts. The following description highlights our major accomplishments in each area of emphasis and in a major civic enterprise, the Spirit &Place Festival, which we direct on behalf of IUPUI and the IU School of Liberal Arts.

2014 Report–Update on Domestic Violence in the Criminal Justice System, Marion County, IN

Up to now, it has been very difficult to generate statistics describing the state of domestic violence in Marion County. This report presents the findings of a feasibility study conducted by The Polis Center at IUPUI for the Domestic Violence Network to link data from four sources that collect information on victims and perpetrators of domestic violence in the legal system, including The Julian Center, Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department (IMPD), Marion County Prosecutor’s Office, Indiana Supreme Court. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating the domestic violence data, given the quality and incompleteness of some of the required data sets, and to determine what analysis and reporting are possible given these limitations. Data had to be cleaned and standardized to ensure comparability across the data sets, and an algorithm was developed to identify unique individuals across all data sets. The result is a report of statistics representing the picture of domestic violence for incidents where the legal system is involved. This does not count all of the incidents that go un-reported.

2014 Indiana Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan

The Indiana Standard Hazard Mitigation Plan was developed in collaboration with government, academic, and private entities for the purpose of preventing, protecting against, responding to, and recovering from disasters that may threaten the state’s citizens, infrastructure, and economy. Following the adoption of the last version of this plan in 2011, the Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS) partnered with The Polis Center (Polis) at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to overhaul the plan and develop a more comprehensive, risk-based approach for assessing the vulnerabilities of the state and its communities. Every section of the plan has been revised with the most current available data.

2014 Earthquake Analysis of Magnitude 6.8 Mount Carmel Illinois for Central and Southern Indiana Action Discovery Report

At the request of Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS) Planning Division, The Polis Center performed an enhanced (Hazus Level 2) earthquake analysis for IDHS Regions 5, 7, 8, and 10 comprising 35 counties in southern and central Indiana. For the purposes of this study, the Indiana Geological Survey (IGS) provided geological information and recommendations for
modeling a 6.8 moment magnitude scenario with an epicenter at Latitude 38.41088, Longitude -87.761417, which is located in Mt. Carmel, Illinois. This scenario was chosen by the Indiana
Geological Survey to simulate a Wabash Valley earthquake. The epicenter is also the location of the recent May 2010 earthquake.

2013 Annual Report

We managed more than 79 projects in FY 2013 within our areas of emphasis; 50 percent of these projects were new grants or contracts. The following description highlights our major accomplishments in each area of emphasis and in a major civic enterprise, the Spirit &Place Festival, which we direct on behalf of IUPUI and the IU School of Liberal Arts.

2013 NSDI Cooperative Agreements Program: Geospatial Platform Cloud Service Test Bed

The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical issues, opportunities, and costs associated with deployment and geoprocessing of IndianaMap Cadastral data in Amazon Cloud Platforms. The IndianaMap portals were developed to provide a central single-source repository of data to support transportation planning, economic development, environmental assessment, and emergency response. The Indiana Office of Technology (IOT) working with the Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS), and the Indiana Geographic Information Council (IGIC) have developed a strategy for creating a seamless parcel map for Indiana. Indiana IOT harvests parcel data from county web feature services monthly. The process includes integrated Spatial ETL (Extract, Transform, and Load) tools to build a seamless state-wide parcel feature class. Currently 85 of 92 counties containing 3,225,000 parcels are included in the statewide layer.

2012 Annual Report

We managed more than 60 projects in FY2012 within our areas of emphasis; 63 percent of these projects were new grants or contracts. The following description highlights our major accomplishments in each area of emphasis and in a major civic enterprise, the Spirit &Place Festival, which we direct on behalf of IUPUI and the IU School of Liberal Arts.

2012 Report–State of Our Black Youth

Indiana Black Expo, Inc.’s 2012 State of Our Black Youth Report (SOBY) presents statewide data on the health and well-being of Indiana’s Black youth, as well as local data for the following 16 communities: Anderson, East Chicago, Elkhart, Evansville, Fort Wayne, Gary, Hammond, Indianapolis, Jeffersonville, Kokomo, Lafayette, Marion, Michigan City, Muncie, South Bend and Terre Haute. The 2012 report, third in the series, provides updates for data contained in the 2005 and 2007 reports, as well as data for new indicators. Additionally, the report offers recommended strategies and promising practices to consider when addressing challenges and enhancing strengths identified by the data.

2000-2012 SAVI Report–Trends in Poverty, Marion County

Poverty is on the rise across the board, but some segments of the population are disproportionately affected. This report looks at the disparities in poverty by age, race, gender, education levels, and geography.

2012 SAVI Community Information System Data Content
SAVI Report–2011 LISC Sustainable Communities Initiative Neighborhood Quality Monitoring Report: Binford Redevelopment and Growth, Inc.

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Sustainable Communities Initiatives supports community-driven efforts to revitalize neighborhoods through comprehensive
community development. In 2006, Indianapolis launched the Great Indy Neighborhoods Initiative (GINI) to promote healthy communities through comprehensive quality of life
planning and development. This effort has resulted in several programs and targeted investments in six demonstration sites throughout the city. This report is intended to help local
funders, civic and neighborhood leaders, and LISC staff monitor change in these areas of concentrated investment by providing local data and indicators of quality of life in one of the
six target neighborhoods, Binford Redevelopment and Growth, Inc. (BRAG).

SAVI Report–2011 LISC Sustainable Communities Initiative Neighborhood Quality Monitoring Report: Crooked Creek

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Sustainable Communities Initiative supports community-driven efforts to revitalize neighborhoods through comprehensive community
development. In 2006, Indianapolis launched the Great Indy Neighborhoods Initiative (GINI) to promote healthy communities through comprehensive quality of life planning and
development. This effort has resulted in several programs and targeted investments in six demonstration sites throughout the city. This report is intended to help local funders, civic
and neighborhood leaders, and LISC staff monitors change in these areas of concentrated investment by providing local data and indicators about the quality of life in one of the six
demonstration neighborhoods, Crooked Creek.

SAVI Report– 2011 LISC Sustainable Communities Initiative Neighborhood Quality Monitoring Report: West Indianapolis

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Sustainable Communities Initiatives supports community-driven efforts to revitalize neighborhoods through comprehensive
community development. In 2006, Indianapolis launched the Great Indy Neighborhoods Initiative (GINI) to promote healthy communities through comprehensive quality-of-life
planning and development. This effort has resulted in several programs and targeted investments in six demonstration sites throughout the city. This report is intended to help local
funders, civic and neighborhood leaders, and LISC staff monitor change in these areas of concentrated investment by providing local data and indicators of quality-of-life in one of the
six target neighborhoods, West Indianapolis

SAVI Report–2011 LISC Sustainable Communities Initiative Neighborhood Quality Monitoring Report: Near Eastside

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Sustainable Communities Initiatives supports community-driven efforts to revitalize neighborhoods through comprehensive community
development. In 2006, Indianapolis launched the Great Indy Neighborhoods Initiative (GINI) to promote healthy communities through comprehensive quality of life planning and
development. This effort has resulted in several programs and targeted investments in six demonstration sites throughout the city. This report is intended to help local funders, civic
and neighborhood leaders, and LISC staff monitor change in these areas of concentrated investment by providing local data and indicators about the quality of life in the Near Eastside,
one of the six demonstration neighborhoods.

SAVI Report–2011 LISC Sustainable Communities Initiative Neighborhood Quality Monitoring Report: Near Westside

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Sustainable Communities Initiatives supports community-driven efforts to revitalize neighborhoods through comprehensive
community development. In 2006, Indianapolis launched the Great Indy Neighborhoods Initiative (GINI) to promote healthy communities through comprehensive quality of life
planning and development. This effort has resulted in several programs and targeted investments in six demonstration sites throughout the city. This report is intended to help local
funders, civic and neighborhood leaders, and LISC staff monitor change in these areas of concentrated investment by providing local data and indicators about the quality of life in
one of the six demonstration neighborhoods, the Near Westside

SAVI Report–2011 LISC Sustainable Communities Initiative Neighborhood Quality Monitoring Report: Southeast

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Sustainable Communities Initiatives supports community-driven efforts to revitalize neighborhoods through comprehensive
community development. In 2006, Indianapolis launched the Great Indy Neighborhoods Initiative (GINI) to promote healthy communities through comprehensive quality-of-life
planning and development. This effort has resulted in several programs and targeted investments in six demonstration sites throughout the city. This report is intended to help local
funders, civic and neighborhood leaders, and LISC staff monitor change in these areas of concentrated investment by providing local data and indicators of quality of life in one of the
six demonstration neighborhoods, Southeast.

2011 SAVI Report–Community Health Resource Guide

This resource guide contains useful information for those who would like to use data to assess the health status of an Indiana community. Targeted users include local organizations such as county health departments and community health coalitions. Being able to access and use relevant data and information resources is a common hurdle for those interested in assessing and advancing community health. As a result of this need and at the request of the Community Advisory Council of the Community Health Engagement Program, we developed this resource guide to assist individuals, organizations, and coalitions in Indiana in identifying appropriate resources that guide their community health research and evaluation activities

2011 SAVI Data Catalog

The SAVI data catalog is a detailed inventory, organized by category and source, of all vulnerability data found in the SAVI Community Information System database. For each topic, the data catalog provides detailed information on source providers, SAVI processing and output, SAVI indicators, reporting levels, data years, and limitations and assumptions. We created the catalog to help users understand the breadth of data available on the SAVI website and the nuances important when using and analyzing the data. The catalog can be used to determine if SAVI includes a particular data source or data about a certain topic and to learn the important details about the data in SAVI that are important to consider before using it for a particular purpose such as research.

Vietnam Veterans’ Experiences with Combat-Related Limb Loss: The Importance of Social Support

The Polis Center at IUPUI, Foote, Carrie E., Regina Pessagno, Robbie Janik

The Indiana-Ohio Center for Traumatic Amputation Rehabilitation Research (IOCTARR) conducts policy-focused research on the various physical and mental health needs of veterans with combat related amputations, also known as traumatic amputations. The aim is to help determine the best ways to implement the rehabilitation processes for traumatic amputees of present and future conflicts. Researchers at IOCTARR hypothesized that United States military personnel who experience an amputation resulting from combat are likely to have unique rehabilitation needs, especially over the life course. examine these issues with Vietnam veterans who experienced combat-related limb loss. Most such surviving veterans have lived with their amputations close to, or slightly more than, 40 years. Understanding their experiences, the basic thrust of the project, should shed substantial light on the nature of both the short and long-term needs of current combat-related amputees. Understanding their experiences should shed substantial light on the nature of both the short and long-term needs of current combat-related amputees. The Amputee Veterans Research Project (AVR) unfolded in three phases and produced a series of reports. This report is the Phase III Social Support Interviews Final Report. Phase III constructed a 159-item survey instrument administered to the entire registry to understand the health and care-giving issues associated with traumatic amputations. Researchers also conducted follow-up interviews with two sets of respondents to develop a keener understanding of survey results, especially around issues of social support.

Executive Summary Amputee Veteran Project Phase II and Phase III

The Polis Center at IUPUI, Carrie E. Foote, Regina Pessagno, James Wolf

The Indiana-Ohio Center for Traumatic Amputation Rehabilitation Research (IOCTARR) conducts policy-focused research on the various physical and mental health needs of veterans with combat related amputations, also known as traumatic amputations. The aim is to help determine the best ways to implement the rehabilitation processes for traumatic amputees of present and future conflicts. Researchers at IOCTARR hypothesized that United States military personnel who experience an amputation resulting from combat are likely to have unique rehabilitation needs, especially over the life course. examine these issues with Vietnam veterans who experienced combat-related limb loss. Most such surviving veterans have lived with their amputations close to, or slightly more than, 40 years. Understanding their experiences, the basic thrust of the project, should shed substantial light on the nature of both the short and long-term needs of current combat-related amputees. Understanding their experiences should shed substantial light on the nature of both the short and long-term needs of current combat-related amputees. The Amputee Veterans Research Project (AVR) unfolded in three phases and produced a series of reports. This report is an executive summary of Phases II and III. Phase II collected in-depth interview data from a randomly drawn sample (n=20) of registrants. These interviews probed participants’ health and welfare needs during the first 12 months of injury and over their post-amputation lives. Phase III constructed a 159-item survey instrument administered to the entire registry to understand the health and care-giving issues associated with traumatic amputations. Researchers also conducted follow-up interviews with two sets of respondents to develop a keener understanding of survey results, especially around issues of social support.

The Experiences of Vietnam Veterans with Combat-Related Limb Loss: Phase III Follow-Up Interview Findings

The Polis Center at IUPUI, Carrie Foote, Ph.D., Regina Pessagno, M.A.

The Indiana-Ohio Center for Traumatic Amputation Rehabilitation Research (IOCTARR) conducts policy-focused research on the various physical and mental health needs of veterans with combat related amputations, also known as traumatic amputations. The aim is to help determine the best ways to implement the rehabilitation processes for traumatic amputees of present and future conflicts. Researchers at IOCTARR hypothesized that United States military personnel who experience an amputation resulting from combat are likely to have unique rehabilitation needs, especially over the life course. examine these issues with Vietnam veterans who experienced combat-related limb loss. Most such surviving veterans have lived with their amputations close to, or slightly more than, 40 years. Understanding their experiences, the basic thrust of the project, should shed substantial light on the nature of both the short and long-term needs of current combat-related amputees. Understanding their experiences should shed substantial light on the nature of both the short and long-term needs of current combat-related amputees. The Amputee Veterans Research Project (AVR) unfolded in three phases and produced a series of reports. This report provides Phase III follow-up interview findings. Phase III constructed a 159-item survey instrument administered to the entire registry to understand the health and care-giving issues associated with traumatic amputations. Researchers also conducted follow-up interviews with two sets of respondents to develop a keener understanding of survey results, especially around issues of social support.

The Experiences of Vietnam Veterans with Combat Related Limb-Loss: Phase II Findings

The Polis Center at IUPUI, Carrie Foote, Ph.D. and Regina Pessagno, M.A.

The Indiana-Ohio Center for Traumatic Amputation Rehabilitation Research (IOCTARR) conducts policy-focused research on the various physical and mental health needs of veterans with combat related amputations, also known as traumatic amputations. The aim is to help determine the best ways to implement the rehabilitation processes for traumatic amputees of present and future conflicts. Researchers at IOCTARR hypothesized that United States military personnel who experience an amputation resulting from combat are likely to have unique rehabilitation needs, especially over the life course. examine these issues with Vietnam veterans who experienced combat-related limb loss. Most such surviving veterans have lived with their amputations close to, or slightly more than, 40 years. Understanding their experiences, the basic thrust of the project, should shed substantial light on the nature of both the short and long-term needs of current combat-related amputees. Understanding their experiences should shed substantial light on the nature of both the short and long-term needs of current combat-related amputees. The Amputee Veterans Research Project (AVR) unfolded in three phases and produced a series of reports. This report is the final report for Phase II. Phase II collected in-depth interview data from a randomly drawn sample (n=20) of registrants. These interviews probed participants’ health and welfare needs during the first 12 months of injury and over their post-amputation lives.

 

SAVI Report–1990-2010 Changing Diversity in Marion County

How can we look beyond the demographic snapshot of our city and begin to explore the social dynamics within and between neighborhoods? An increasingly important concept in public life, diversity can be described in the most basic sense as the number of groups represented in a place and the proportions of each. A deeper understanding of the state of diversity in our community can include how and why these proportions change over time and how the groups interact with each other.

1999 Annual Report

As The Polis Center approached its 10th anniversary, it set out to evaluate its position and accomplishments thus far and to plan for its future. The administrative and organizational structures that had evolved over the years as the Center grew clearly needed rethinking if Polis was to continue growing in new directions. The reorganization process began with a months-long interview and evaluation process conducted with the aid of the consulting firm Strategies for Tomorrow, Inc. In September 1998, Strategies for Tomorrow facilitated a retreat for Polis staff in which ideas for the Center’s future development were discussed at a daylong session. A number of suggestions that emerged from the self evaluation process have been put into practice

1998 Annual Report

Now entering our tenth year as a self-supported unit of the School of Liberal Arts, we have over 17 active projects with total budgets exceeding $10 million. Notably, these awards come from a variety of sources in line with our long-standing practice of seeking a diversified funding stream. With a major award of $3.5 million in July 1998, after the close of the reporting period, our
nine-year total includes almost 200 projects with income of approximately $20 million. Awards anticipated in FY 1999 will increase this total by $2 to $6 million or more. A list of projects accompanies this report.